Tuesday, 22 July 2008

Mazda at the British International Motorshow


A total of 16 different types of Mazda cars will be on show at BIMS which starts tomorrow and is located on the East Side of London within the Docklands area.

Highlights of Mazda's involvement include unveilings of The Mazda Furai concept (pronounced ‘foo-rye’ – Japanese for ‘sound of the wind’) which is the latest in Mazda's Nagare-based concepts. The Furai combines the striking design aesthetic of the Nagare with a more functional twist in an attempt to merge the the idea of a road car with a race car. The inclusion of 'flow lines' actually enhances the vehicle's aerodynamic performance by channelling air-flow over the body of the car.

The new Mazda RX-8 R3 four-seater sports coupe will also be on show. Enhancements to the classic sports car include a new front bumper, front grille, intake ducts, headlamps, front fender designs, LED rear lamps and a redesigned rear bumper with larger exhaust pipes.

Also, the thrilling 'Mazda Zoom-Zoom Challenge’ will be taking place at BIMS. The event was a big success at the 2006 Show, and will allow over 5,000 people to get behind the wheel of Mazda’s cars and battle against the clock, at no charge, to experience their spirited handling and entertaining drive.

For fans of the Mazda RX series...

Mazda RX-7 - Mazda's Rotary Engine Sportscar - Updated & Enlarged New Edition
By Brian Long



Enlarged new edition of the definitive international history of Mazda’s extraordinarily successful Wankel-engined coupés & roadsters right up to the end of production and the introduction of the RX-8. Advice on buying your own RX-7. The RX-7 in motorsport. Production figures. High quality artpaper production, heavily illustrated with colour throughout. CONTENTS Mazda launched its first rotary-engined car - the Cosmo - in 1966 and was the only car manufacturer to solve the major problems associated with Wankel’s radical engine design so that the unit’s potential could be exploited and enjoyed. Launched in 1978, the RX-7 provided effortless and uncannily smooth performance, attributes that endeared the model to enthusiasts through three generations of production. With each reincarnation the RX-7 became more of a Grand Tourer and less of a sportscar (a mantle handed on to the MX-5/Miata); global sales reduced as the car moved upmarket until, in the new millennium, the model was only sold in its native Japan.

click here for more info